chemicalChemical

At BSKB, we combine industry knowledge with intellectual property law expertise. That’s why all of the intellectual property law attorneys and technical advisors in our Chemical Practice Group have either undergraduate or graduate degrees in chemistry or chemical engineering. Many of us began our careers as patent examiners at the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), chemists, process engineers or professors.

Our diverse technical backgrounds and experiences help us to better understand complex chemistries and highly technical engineering issues. We prepare and prosecute hundreds of chemical patent applications in the USPTO, and various foreign countries, each year.

We represent pharmaceutical and chemical companies around the world and have prosecuted chemical patents in the areas of polymer chemistry, chemical processing and synthesis, catalysts, materials science, organic and inorganic chemistry, pharmaceutical chemistry, physical chemistry and nanotechnology.

 

 

Attorneys and Professionals

  • Gerald Murphy

    Gerald M. Murphy, Jr.

    Partner

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  • Eugene Perez

    Eugene T. Perez

    Partner

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  • Vanessa Perez

    Vanessa Perez-Ramos

    Of Counsel

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  • Whitney Remily

    Whitney Remily

    Of Counsel

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  • Chad Rink

    Chad M. Rink

    Partner

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  • Leonard R. Svensson

    Senior Counsel

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  • Marc Weiner

    Marc S. Weiner

    Partner

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Related Articles

  • April 28, 2020

    Indefinite claims at the PTAB

    by Chad M. Rink and Hailey R. Bureau, Ph.D. | World Intellectual Property Review

    Chad Rink and Hailey Bureau, Ph.D. talk about indefinite claims at the PTAB and alternative routes in WIPR- Issue 1.

    Learn More
  • February 8, 2018

    Prior Art Takes New Shapes: Relying on Non-traditional Prior Art to Invalidate a Patent

    by MaryAnne Armstrong, Ph.D. | Pharmaceutical Patent Analyst

    When we teach kids today about Internet privacy, one of the things that is emphasized is that once something has been posted on the Internet, that posting seemingly takes on a life of its own, with an eternal existence, even if the original poster deletes the posting. Unfortunately, companies have not learned this lesson and temporal items, such as press releases and Internet publications, can come back to haunt a patent owner in the form of invalidating prior art for a post-grant review. The following paragraphs consider ‘non-traditional’ prior art, for example, press releases, Internet publications, drug labels among others, and examine considerations in determining whether such non-traditional prior art can be used as a basis for invalidating a patent.

    Learn More
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