licensing_iconLicensing

In addition to helping clients secure protection for their own intellectual property, BSKB represents companies looking to license intellectual property rights to others to expand markets for their goods and services or to obtain licenses from others for more freedom to sell a broader range of goods or services. BSKB also assists clients who look to cross-license intellectual property rights to create joint cooperation agreements with other companies or, as part of a more complex litigation scenario, to settle disputes with other companies.

BSKB provides legal opinions for both prospective licensors and licensees to ensure companies can move forward with licensing and acquisition plans with confidence in the value of the related intellectual property. BSKB also assists clients with an inventory and valuation of intellectual property rights and identifying and targeting potential licensing targets, as well as drafting simple to highly complex intellectual property licensing agreements.

 

Attorneys and Professionals

  • Richard Anderson

    D. Richard Anderson

    Partner

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  • Alireza Behrooz

    Alireza Behrooz, Ph.D.

    Of Counsel

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  • Charles Gorenstein

    Charles Gorenstein

    Senior Counsel

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  • Hyuk Jung Kwon

    Hyuk Jung Kwon

    Associate

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  • Michael Mutter

    Michael K. Mutter

    Partner

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  • Jun Nakamara

    Jun (Atsushi) Nakamura

    Registered Patent Agent

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  • Whitney Remily

    Whitney Remily

    Of Counsel

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